Tag Archives: ice cream

Summer Parties Beg For Ice Cream Sandwiches!

It’s Thursday already which means that my vacation at the cottage is drawing  to an end way too quickly. I must vacate tomorrow afternoon to let a brand new set of vacationers come and bask in our idyllic setting.  I had promised myself days on end of uninterrupted blog writing and instead, I found myself scrambling for several days looking for inspiration… How ironic to now have the time to let my creativity flow and end up suffering from writer’s block while when I am at work, and have very little time to spare, my mind is full of ideas. I wanted to write a lot and to write something that would suck you right in, wanting to read bit more, maybe to read it all. In hopes of getting my pen and my mojo flowing, I settled in comfortably on the sun filled porch with several of my favourite cookbook authors, reading chapter upon chapter of what inspires them most and what sparks their culinary passions. Maybe by osmosis of the great ones, I could trigger some creativity of my own? I read about Dominique Ansel’s impressive rise to glory (he’s the Cronut guy from NYC) and how Rachel Roddy settled in Rome while searching to find something else in her life (she’s high up there on my list of faves). I read several chapters of Yotam Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem and his love affair with his old world, regretted not having brought along Mimi Thorrisson’s or David Lebovitz’s books and managed to get caught up on several past editions of Bon Appétit magazine, especially the latest few about summer everything! I am completely absorbed by cookbooks that read like novels, of stories of visits to farmer’s markets, fishmongers, butchers and bakeries. I love to read about that special second hand deep dish enamel glazed cast iron pot that was snatched up somewhere in a remote country side flea market and that now makes the perfect cassoulet. As I read and entered their world, it struck me how much we are the same. They are like old friends, whom you wish to linger with over a long stretched out meal, tossing dirty plates aside once emptied to be cleaned much later, sweeping breadcrumbs with the back of the hand, not wanting to leave the table while another bottle gets uncorked. At the root of each of these authors’ books are the memories of meals of their childhoods, of family gatherings and of dinners with friends, which inherently has always been the driving force behind my own love affair with food.

And so it came to me after reading pages and pages of meals served in bucolic settings or whipped up in tiny, awkward and poorly appointed kitchens. That is exactly what just happened this past weekend; whipping up meals for a huge crowd in a bucolic setting in an awkward kitchen!!! Instant inspiration! The King and I just crowned another successful family gathering at our cottage, an annual event that seems to grow each year as our young ones now have dates to share in the fun with. Although the weekend is a community effort of potluck dishes, snacks and desserts, my fun is to take over the big Saturday night feast. It takes me weeks to finally settle on the menu for the event and I love every minute of planning! Feeding crowds of hungry guests seem to come naturally to me… I remember exactly when I hosted my first grown up reception, it was in the summer of 1990. I set to make my first gastronomic meal for 10 wanting to showcase my beautiful new china, acquired barely a year prior when my King and I walked out of a church under a shower of confetti. To be frank, I don’t remember much of the menu details other than little smoke salmon and crème fraiche pumpernickel tartines and grilled shrimps with aioli served as appetizers. I know the cocktail was followed by a three course sit down meal yet I forget what I served. But what I remember, and what my guests remember (most are still part of my life) is the mood of that evening. It was a classy backyard affair, complete with our brand new «newlywed» china, silver and crystal. Tables were draped with flowing white tablecloths and little white lights and candles gave off a beautiful glow against the grapevine backdrop. It was the type of evening that lingers just so and you wish never to end… My own heart was conquered by the perfection of that night and I have since pursued to recreate the magic, often getting pretty darn close yet never quite fully capturing that exact vibe, as it often happens with «firsts». But close enough and just as recently as this past weekend, there was magic again in the air….

Feeding a lot of people is always a challenge, especially when you count on Mother Nature’s generous spirit to grace the event with perfect weather. Over the years I have learned that my minuscule cottage kitchen is amazing at feeding crowds and that using the rotisserie feature on the BBQ may seem like a bright idea but better kept for smaller more intimate dinner parties. I have learned that candles are absolutely necessary to bring magic to any table, even when it is dressed with a cheap plastic tablecloth and that planning a «make most of it ahead» menu guarantees I can partake with everyone from the get go. I have learned that renting dishes is amazing for the main feast and Royal Chinet is a crowd’s best friend for all the other meals. And lastly, I have learned that although many question the necessity of serving dessert when planning is under way (everyone is always watching their waistline), somehow homemade desserts disappear much, much faster than a plate of crudités!!! In keeping with my «make as much ahead as possible» philosophy, one of the desserts I chose to make this year were ice cream sandwiches from scratch. I decided that this handheld bundle of sweetness would be perfect for cottage life and would please all age groups. My chocolate chip cookies already having a near cult following, a recipe I have adapted from a Martha Stewart original, they would be the perfect vehicle to carry big scoops of homemade ice cream. It was also high time I put my lovely ice cream machine to good use: having stored it away after moving from the big house to the smaller apartment 3 years ago. I suddenly had a light bulb moment: this machine would serve us all much better at the cottage where frozen treats are highly favoured but transporting them from grocery store to the lake can be a bit of a gamble. Why have I not thought of this sooner??? The ice cream machine now has a new home and it has been used more often this summer than in the past 4 or 5 years since it has been purchased. And so project ice cream sandwich it was! Made in advance and appreciated by happy guests, it was the perfect dessert for this crowd!

My tip to you: plan ahead. It is nearly impossible to make ice cream in one day. Unless you own a commercial machine or blast chiller, time is your very best friend and most important ingredient. If you make a custard type ice cream, as in the recipes that follow, you will need a good solid 12 hours of chilling time once the custard is cooked. The churning vessel from your machine probably needs a good 24 hours in the freezer to freeze properly. Once your ice cream has churned, it benefits from spending another several hours in the freezer to solidify although it is ready to spoon on the cookies immediately. Once filled, the sandwiches will also need a bit of time in the freezer to firm up. The cookies should be made ahead as well. Although the cookie recipe I present to you is awesome and makes a huge batch, any favourite cookie recipe of your own collection will pair well with ice cream. Just remember that it is easier to eat a sandwich made with thin cookies… Then again, messes are fun too and cookies with ice cream are a match made in heaven regardless of the cookie flavour, thickness or size. Have fun! But beware, you may start something in your household that could result in begging for you to make more of and more often!

This post offers 3 recipes and each does not need the other to de devoured but magic sure happens when they are combined together! Making ice cream is not complicated but I will not sugar coat it:  it is a project that requires time and planning. The rest is as easy as making a batch of cookies and cooking a custard.

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Sweet stack

THIN CRISPY-CHEWY CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

Adapted from an original recipe by Martha Stewart

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Ingredient line-up
What you need

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 2 cups butter, softened
  • 3 cups packed light brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1½ cups chocolate chips

How to make it

  1. Heat your oven to 350°F and line sheet with parchment paper
  2. Mix together flour, salt, baking soda and cream of tartar
  3. Beat butter until smooth. Add sugars and beat until combined and fluffy
  4. Beat in the eggs, one at a time and then vanilla until well blended
  5. Add flour and beat on low until just blended
  6. Add chocolate chips and beat until well combined
  7. Drop on cookie sheets, 2-3 tbsp of batter, (I use a medium ice cream scoop) and spread about inches apart. The high butter content of these cookies will make them spread a fair bit. It is best not to crowd your baking sheet.
  8. Flatten each mound slightly by wetting hands with cold water which will prevent the dough from sticking to your fingers
  9. Bake 12-16 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool completely.

Notes:

  • If the batter spreads too quickly in the oven and looks like the butter is oozing out, it is a sign that your oven is too hot. It is wise to invest in an oven thermometer as each oven has its own personality. Some ovens allow thermometer adjustments while others don’t. Exact oven temperature is more important when baking. Cooking or roasting are a temperature are a bit more forgiving. Manufacturers have online
  • Salted and unsalted butter can be used interchangeably, each offering a subtle flavour variation
  • This batch makes a ton of cookies, maybe 60 or so. You can shape the cookies and freeze the raw dough in individual portions, pulling out a few cookie «pucks» as needed and have freshly baked cookies on a whim.
  • The recipe can be halved
  • Once baked, the cookies can also be frozen
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    They can be individually frozen at this stage and pulled out when craving warm homemade chocolate chip cookies!
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Hard to resist…

VANILLA ICE CREAM

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Churned just right…
This recipe is based on a traditional custard type ice cream, which yields a super rich and unctuous frozen dessert. Because the base is cooked, it is best to prepare one day ahead and chill thoroughly overnight for best results.

To fill all the cookies, you will need 2 batches of ice cream. I opted for variety and made both chocolate and vanilla.

What you need

  • 1½ cups of heavy cream (whipping cream or 35% cream)
  • 2½ cups milk (avoid non fat milk)
  • 8 egg yolks
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 pod of fresh vanilla or 2 tsp real vanilla extract

How to make it

  1. If you are using a machine fitted with a liquid filled vessel, make sure you set it to freeze at least 24 hours before you need to churn your ice cream.
  2. Separate the egg yolks from the white. You can save the egg whites for another recipe such as meringue or egg white omelet. Egg whited freeze very well.
  3. Pour the cream and milk in a deep casserole with a heavy bottom, whisk in ¼ cup of the sugar and the salt.
  4. Split the vanilla pod in the center and using the tip of the knife, scrape the paste and whisk into the milk. Add in the leftover pod as well.
  5. On medium heat, cook until it starts to foam slightly on the edges, stirring frequently with a heat proof rubber spatula to ensure the milk doesn’t burn at the bottom.
  6. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk the eggs with the remaining ½ cup sugar until light and fluffy.
  7. Once the cream mixture has heated up, temper the egg yolks by slowly incorporating a bit of hot cream. To achieve this, make sure your bowl is secured onto your work surface. I like to settle my bowl onto a wet dishcloth. Using a whisk in one hand and a ladle in the other, vigorously whisk the eggs while incorporating a trickle of hot cream slowly but steadily. Proceed this way until half the milk has been incorporated into the eggs. The preparation should be smooth and grit free. If the preparation looks grainy or full of little lumps, you need to start again: it means the yolks have started cooking before emulsifying with the hot cream. Some like to use a stand-up mixer fitted with the whisk attachment which frees up their hand to control the addition of hot milk better. I find that taking my time and pouring just a bit of hot milk at a time works just as well. Chose a technique that better suit your needs.
  8. Once your eggs have been tempered with half of the hot milk, pour back into the casserole into the remaining hot cream while whisking.
  9. Cook over medium to medium-high heat stirring constantly until mixture thickens and just about to start to bubble. Remove from heat immediately and pour over a fine mesh sieve into a heat proof bowl. Let cool slightly, cover the entire surface with plastic wrap of parchment paper to avoid the formation of a crust.
  10. Once cooled enough, chill in the fridge for a good 12 hours. You can reduce the chilling time by placing the custard in the freezer for a few hours: just remember to stir frequently to cool evenly.
  11. Churning: once the vessel is frozen solid and the custard completely chilled, set your ice cream to churn according to your appliance’s instructions. I own a Cuisinart and the machine is pretty straight forward: place custard in the vessel, add churning blade, cover and turn on. There are no other speeds. It takes about 30-35 minutes of churning.
  12. If you are making ice cream sandwiches, leave the ice cream in the churning vessel as you assemble your sandwiches. The vessel is still frozen enough to keep the ice cream from melting too quickly. Set an opened container in the freezer and build 1 or 2 sandwiches at a time, placing them in the freezer as soon as each is assembled
  13. If you do not plan on making ice cream sandwiches, then once the churning is completed, transfer the mixture to another container, cover the surface well with plastic wrap and set to freeze a little longer, maybe 3-4 hours more before serving. The plastic wrap prevents the formation of ice crystals on the surface of the ice cream and also prevents the ice cream from absorbing unwanted “freezer flavour”.

INTENSELY CHOCOLATEY ICE CREAM

The recipe is slightly different than the vanilla ice cream recipe.

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Chocolatey goodness!
What you need

  • 1½ cups of heavy cream (whipping cream or 35% cream)
  • 2½ cups milk (avoid non fat milk)
  • 8 egg yolks
  • 1 cup sugar, divided in 2
  • ½ cup dark cocoa powder*
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp real vanilla extract

*Since cocoa powder is the star ingredient in making a rich and chocolatey ice cream, I recommend a good splurge on a high quality cocoa.

How to make it

If you are using a machine fitted with a liquid filled vessel, make sure you set it to freeze at least 24 hours before you need to churn your ice cream.

  1. Separate the egg yolks from the white. You can save the egg whites for another recipe such as meringue or egg white omelet. Egg whited freeze very well.
  2. In a medium size bowl, whisk together the cocoa powder, ½ cup of sugar, salt and 1 cup of milk until smooth, set aside
  3. Pour the cream and remaining milk in a deep casserole with a heavy bottom. Add vanilla
  4. On medium heat, cook until it starts to foam slightly on the edges, stirring frequently with a heat proof rubber spatula to ensure the milk doesn’t burn at the bottom.
  5. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk the eggs with the remaining ½ cup sugar until light and fluffy.
  6. Once the cream mixture has heated up, temper the egg yolks by slowly incorporating a bit of hot liquid. To achieve this, make sure your bowl is secured onto your work surface. I like to settle my bowl onto a wet dishcloth. Using a whisk in one hand and a ladle in the other, vigorously whisk the eggs while incorporating a trickle of hot cream slowly but steadily. Proceed this way until all the milk has been incorporated into the eggs. The preparation should be smooth and grit free. If the preparation looks grainy or full of little lumps, you need to start again: it means the yolks have started cooking before emulsifying with the hot cream. Some like to use a stand-up mixer fitted with the whisk attachment which frees up their hand to control the addition of hot milk better. I find that taking my time and pouring just a bit of hot milk at a time works just as well. Chose a technique that better suit your needs.
  7. Once your eggs have been tempered with half of the hot milk, pour back into the casserole into the remaining hot cream while whisking. Whisk in the cocoa/milk mixture.
  8. Cook over medium to medium-high heat stirring constantly until mixture thickens and just about to start to bubble. Remove from heat immediately and pour over a fine mesh sieve into a heat proof bowl. Let cool slightly, cover the entire surface with plastic wrap of parchment paper to avoid the formation of a crust.
  9. Once cooled enough, chill in the fridge for a good 12 hours.You can reduce the chilling time by placing the custard in the freezer for a few hours: just remember to stir frequently to cool evenly.
  10. Churning: once the vessel is frozen solid and the custard completely chilled, set your ice cream to churn according to your appliance’s instructions. I own a Cuisinart and the machine is pretty straight forward: place custard in the vessel, add churning blade, cover and turn on. There are no other speeds. It takes about 30-35 minutes of churning.
  11. If you are making ice cream sandwiches, leave the ice cream in the churning vessel as you assemble your sandwiches. The vessel is still frozen enough to keep the ice cream from melting too quickly. Set an opened container in the freezer and build 1 or 2 sandwiches at a time, placing them in the freezer as soon as each is assembled
  12. If you do not plan on making ice cream sandwiches, then once the churning is completed, transfer the mixture to another container, cover the surface well with plastic wrap and set to freeze a little longer, maybe 3-4 hours more before serving. The plastic wrap prevents the formation of ice crystals on the surface of the ice cream and also prevents the ice cream from absorbing unwanted “freezer flavour”.

Epilogue: these ice cream sandwiches are huge! And although at first the sheer size of them light a spark of delight in the recipients’ eyes, we all agreed that a half went a long way to satisfy. Therefore, I recommend cutting in half before serving. And since we had both chocolate and vanilla to chose from, those with a really sweet tooth could enjoy a half of each, back to back.

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Ready for one last chill!
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